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Whelehans Health News

Holiday tips part 2 - more helpful advice on minimising potential health issues while you're on holiday

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Holiday Tips Part 2 Jet Lag Our bodies adjust to a natural rhythm that promotes sleeping at night and being active and alert during daylight hours. When we travel across different ‘time zones’ our normal rhythm is altered. This can cause sleep disturbances, inability to concentrate and irritability which is more commonly known as ‘jet lag’.   To prevent jet lag, get a good night sleep before the journey. Some people find that changing their watch to the destination time helps. On arrival at your destination, you should get active as soon as possible and adjust your meals and activities...

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Following last weeks Holiday Tips - some more useful info on travel related health matters

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Holiday Tips Part 2 Jet Lag Our bodies adjust to a natural rhythm that promotes sleeping at night and being active and alert during daylight hours. When we travel across different ‘time zones’ our normal rhythm is altered. This can cause sleep disturbances, inability to concentrate and irritability which is more commonly known as ‘jet lag’.   To prevent jet lag, get a good night sleep before the journey. Some people find that changing their watch to the destination time helps. On arrival at your destination, you should get active as soon as possible and adjust your meals and activities...

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Heading off on holiday? Some advice on what you can do now to mitigate certain risks before you travel (Part 1 of 2)

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Holiday Tips Part 1 Several diseases travelers should be aware of include hepatitis A, typhoid and malaria. Hepatitis A: a liver viral infection contracted from contaminated food or water or from close contact with an infected person.  Practicing good hygiene will protect against catching the hepatitis A.  A vaccine is also available. Typhoid is contracted in the same way as hepatitis A but is caused by a bacterium instead of a virus.  The bacterium, called Salmonella typhi, enters the intestines and can spread to the bloodstream. Antibiotics are used to treat typhoid. It is recommended to get vaccinated against the...

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The sun's out!! concluding part of our timely advice on Hay Fever - discussing treatment and management options

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Hayfever- Part 2 Treatment As total avoidance of triggers like pollen is impossible, medication is often needed to control symptoms. Antihistamines Oral antihistamines are effective in relieving eye symptoms, running nose, sneezing and nasal irritation but have negligible effect on nasal congestion. Antihistamines are useful in patients with troublesome symptoms at multiple sites e.g. itching of roof of the mouth, throat or eyes. First Generation Antihistamines. ("Sedative") Sedation is the most common side effect of these drugs and may affect the patient’s ability to drive and operate machinery and concentrate. They should not be used in patients with prostatic hypertrophy...

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Part 1 of 2 - With summer on the horizon - helpful advice on symptoms and management of Hay Fever

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Hayfever- Part 1 Hay fever is a type of allergic rhinitis caused by pollen or spores. Hay fever affects the nose, sinuses, throat, and eyes. From May to July grass and flowers are in pollen, so is the most common time for hay fever. Mould and fungi also release tiny reproductive particles, called spores which also cause allergies. Grass is the most common cause of hayfever.   Hay fever is a common condition that affects around 20% of the population. Hay fever is more likely if there is a family history of allergies, particularly asthma or eczema. Hay fever usually begins in...

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