Menu
Cart 0

Whelehans Health News

1st of 3 pts reviewing the most type of arrhythmia - Atrial Fibrillation (AF)- this week - background info and different types of AF

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Atrial fibrillation  Part 1   Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of arrhythmia. An arrhythmia is a heart rhythm problem. The heart may beat too quickly, too slowly or in an irregular pattern.   Types of arrythmia include: Tachycardia: fast heart rate of more than 100 beats per minute. Bradycardia: Slow heart rhythm below 60 beats per minute. Supraventricular arrhythmias: Arrhythmias manifesting from the atria (heart’s upper chambers) Ventricular arrhythmias: Arrhythmias manifesting from the ventricles (heart’s lower chambers) Bradyarrhythmias: Slow heart rhythms due to disease in the heart’s conduction system affecting the sinoatrial (SA) node, atrioventricular (AV) node or the His-Purkinje network.   Atrial...

Read more →

Concluding our "all things flu" review - this week - Childrens Flu Vaccines

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Children Flu Vaccines   Flu vaccine for children Children are more likely than adults to get severe complications of flu. Children who are sick with flu miss days in crèche, childcare and school. They also miss out on their usual activities such as hobbies and sports. For the second year in Ireland, children aged 2 to 12 can get the nasal flu vaccine for free. It is available from Whelehans Pharmacies. The flu vaccine will help protect your child against flu and reduce the spread of flu to others.   The vaccine is given as a single spray in each nostril of your child's nose....

Read more →

In the final part of our halitosis (bad breath) review -- we discuss diagnosis and offer tips of prevention

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Halitosis (Bad breath) Part 2   Diagnosis in severe cases It is rare that someone must get diagnosed with halitosis as they will be aware of it themselves or those close to them will make them aware of it and the steps described in this article will ease symptoms in most cases Specific diagnosis tools are only used in rare cases where halitosis is so severe and persistent despite simple and well recognised steps including improved dental hygiene and improving diet. In this situation, three methods for measuring halitosis are: Organoleptic measurement Gas chromatography Sulphide monitoring. Organoleptic measurement has shortcomings...

Read more →

Halitosis (Bad Breath) - 1st of two parts discussing causes of bad breath

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Halitosis (Bad breath) Part 1   Up to 50% (22 to 50%) of the population suffer from bad breath and approximately half of these experience a severe problem leading to personal and social discomfort and social embarrassment.  The “mouth air” of those suffering from more severe halitosis is tainted with compounds including hydrogen sulphide, methyl mercaptan and organic acids leading to foul smelling air.   Causes The source of the bad odour is located within the oral cavity in approximately 90% of cases of halitosis meaning only a small percentage of cases are due to non-oral causes such as a...

Read more →

Just how much sugar is there in.........? A quick review of the dangers of hidden sugars in food

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Our sugar intake   How much sugar am I “allowed” daily? The maximum recommended intake of added sugar is 6 teaspoons a day (24g).  If you are adding sugar to your tea and coffee, try an artificial sweetener as it does not affect your blood sugar levels in the same way as refined sugar and has zero calories.  Familiarise yourself with sugar content of foods Look at the food label relating to 100g of the product and anything under 5g of sugar per 100g is a low sugar product.   To see how much sugar the actual product contains i.e. cereal...

Read more →