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Whelehans Health Blog

Pt 2 of 3 of our Biologic treatment for severe Asthma review - this week - Biologic drug recommendations

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Biologics for severe Asthma New Asthma treatment Part 2           How long should biologics be used There are currently no set guidelines on how long a biologic should be used for severe asthma.  Guidelines recommend trialling a biologic for a minimum four months to determine if it improves severe asthma symptoms. Consultants are given specific guidelines of how often to review and will decide if the biologic is to continue based on response. European guidelines on biologic use Treatment guidelines were produced by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI)   EAACI Biologic Therapies...

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1st of 3 parts reviewing a new treatment for severe Asthma - Biologic Therapy drugs

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Biologics for severe Asthma New Asthma Treatment Part 1   Biologics are a new class of drugs called monoclonal antibodies licenced for severe asthma. They reduce the inflammation in the respiratory tract. Only respiratory specialists can prescribe biologics.   Most biologics are given by subcutaneous injection once or twice a month. All biologics are an add-on option and do not replace existing reliever and preventer medication, but patients should eventually be able to reduce the dosage of existing therapies such as inhaled corticosteroids. Biologics are available to target the two subtypes of Type-2 Severe Asthma (i.e.) allergic (IgE-mediated) asthma and...

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A review of Dysmenorrhoea (painful menstrual cramps) and how to manage / treat the condition

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Dysmenorrhoea   Dysmenorrhoea is monthly painful cramps at the time of menstruation; it can be primary or secondary.   Primary dysmenorrhoea Primary dysmenorrhoea is painful periods not associated with another identifiable pelvic condition or disease. Primary dysmenorrhoea peaks between the ages of 20 and 24 years of age and then decreases. Between 15 to 30% of young women suffer from severe primary dysmenorrhoea. Primary dysmenorrhoea generally starts within a year of first period (menarche) which correlates to when ovulatory cycles first occur. Risk factors include early age starting periods (eg. Less than 12), low body mass index and family history....

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Final part of our review of Atrial Fibrillation Treatment - this week - others options to consider if standard practice treatments are ineffective

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Atrial fibrillation Treatment Part 3   Other options to maintain sinus rhythm   Other options may be considered if cardioversion or anti-arrhythmic drugs are not successful or if side effects from medication are a problem   Cardiac Ablation Cardiac ablation involves the using small burns or freezes to create scarring on the inside of the heart to prevent conduction of abnormal electrical signals travelling from the atria to the ventricles. An ablation involves inserting and threading a small catheter via blood vessels in the groin to the heart either to administer small burns to heart tissue using radiofrequency energy or...

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Continuing our review of Atrial Fibrillation treatment, Part 2 looks at benefits of Cardioversion

Posted by Eamonn Brady on

Atrial fibrillation Treatment Part 2   Cardioversion If AF is recent or causing severe symptoms a cardioversion is a good option to reinstate normal heart rhythm. A cardioversion involves using a small electric shock through electrodes (patches or paddles) placed on the chest while the patient in under a general anaesthetic. The electrodes are connected to defibrillator which delivers shocks in a controlled manor to the chest.   Risks from cardioversion As blood clots may develop within the atria due to slow or less consistent blood slow due to AF, a risk from cardioversion is that a thrombus (blood clot) breaks...

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